BA (HONS) FASHION COMMUNICATION

Ceasefire Baby

Since moving to Edinburgh, I have noticed how life differs so dramatically in comparison to my home country- life seems to be stuck in a time of backwards morals, particularly surrounding sectarianism and dated stereotypes. The past of civil war has resulted in a shadow of intragenerational trauma passed on from the population who survived the troubles, to those born during and after the ceasefire. There is a grip of religion, fear culture and extreme right-wing ideals which our country just cannot seem to let go of. However, my generation are children of the peace process and we have had enough of the endless bigotry that is still so present within our society, who so desperately need to move forward and create a society of peace and unity. My publication, ‘Ceasefire Baby’ explores socio-political and intergenerational sectarianism from the gaze of the ceasefire babies, who strive for the eradication of the sectarian hue that still looms over a country that fought so bitterly for peace. Sectarian stereotypes that run through Northern Ireland veins, and I am going to explore what Northern Irishness really means in today’s society. Throughout the publication, I have highlighted issues such as sectarianism and how it is deeply ingrained into our culture, with the hope of changing the mentality of those who feel set in the past.

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The Ulsterman' explores concept of hyper-masculinised stereotypes that are perpetuated amongst men from both communities in Northern Ireland. Since the ceasefire, Northern Ireland has faced a mental health crisis that has disproportionately affected men as the grip of toxic-masculinity persists. The combination of intergenerational trauma, fear and hatred has created a society of that are stigmatised for being anything other than traditional.

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‘We Don’t Worship’ is based on the pressures faced my the ceasefire generation to conform to religious denominations due to family tradition. From birth, we are categorised as Catholic or Protestant and this label follows us throughout life, even if we no longer want not be associated with religion. This concept is based on the idea of breaking away from tradition and the obsession with religion that has caused so much pain for so many people.

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The Ulsterman' explores concept of hyper-masculinised stereotypes that are perpetuated amongst men from both communities in Northern Ireland. Since the ceasefire, Northern Ireland has faced a mental health crisis that has disproportionately affected men as the grip of toxic-masculinity persists. The combination of intergenerational trauma, fear and hatred has created a society of that are stigmatised for being anything other than traditional.

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‘All Touts Are Targets’ explores the resurgence of Loyalist paramilitaries and some Republican paramilitary groups, praying on predominantly working class young people of the more deprived areas of Northern Ireland sparked by the long drawn out uncertainty of Brexit. Tensions have been rising in Northern Ireland as the threat of the countries place in the Union becomes more and more fragile due to the recent Brexit deals, causing widespread insecurity amongst the unionist communities.

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Usins' and Yousins' has been inspired by the afters football culture has on the progression of peace in Northern Ireland and the influence if holds on the ceasefire generation. Sport is an important factor when discussing the culture of sectarianism in Northern Ireland; for many it inspires unity, hope, and solidarity and can act as a medium to ignite community relations. However, the reality is, football culture is sed as a tool to push a deeper divide between an already wounded society.

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